Atomic clusters in a Penning trap: investigation of their properties and utilization as diagnostic tools
J. Phys. B 42 (15), 154024, August 2009
Submitted to Cluster Science: 5 January 2010
Last Update: 6 January 2011

10.1088/0953-4075/42/15/154024
OA Status: can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF

Abstract

Ion traps are useful tools for many investigations on charged molecules and clusters. At ClusterTrap, the Penning trap is more than just a storage device. The split-ring electrodes allow radial excitations of the trapped-ion motion such that the ions can be centred in the trap or ejected from it, thus allowing the study of size-selected charged clusters. The extended ion-storage times have proven useful for the investigation of reactions and cluster-decay mechanisms. Collisional and laser excitation have been performed as well as electron-impact ionization for the characterization of cluster properties as a function of the cluster size. More recently, it was realized that the Penning trap set-up is particularly suitable for the production of polyanionic clusters. On the other hand, the clusters themselves are useful probes for the investigation of simultaneously stored charged particles. This paper contains examples of recent experimental results on the production and decay modes of polyanionic clusters, some of which also provide information about the properties of the electron-bath ensemble used in that process.

Classifications

Document Type experimental
Research Field Experimental Techniques

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